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Guide Solar Program Overview : Fiscal Years 2002& 2003 (Brochure)

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Technological changes in the solar power industry could render our products uncompetitive or obsolete, which could reduce our market share and cause our revenues and profit to decline. The solar power market is characterized by evolving technology standards that require improved features, such as more efficient and higher power output, improved aesthetics and smaller size.

This requires us to develop new solar module products and enhancements for existing solar module products to keep pace with evolving industry standards and changing customer requirements.


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Technologies developed by others may prove more advantageous than ours for the commercialization of solar module products and may render our technology obsolete. Our failure to further refine our technology and develop and introduce new solar module products could cause our products to become uncompetitive or obsolete, which could reduce our market share and cause our revenues to decline.

We will need to invest significant financial resources in research and development to maintain our market position, keep pace with technological advances in the solar power industry and effectively compete in the future. If our future innovations fail to enable us to maintain or improve our competitive position, we may lose market share. If we are unable to successfully design, develop and introduce or bring to market competitive new solar module products, or enhance our existing solar module products, we may not be able to compete successfully.

Competing solar power technologies may result in lower manufacturing costs or higher product performance than those expected from our solar module products. In addition, if we are unable to manage product transitions, our business and results of operations would be negatively affected. Our business depends substantially on the continuing efforts of our executive officers, and our business may be severely disrupted if we lose their services. Our future success depends substantially on the continued services of our executive officers, especially Dr.

Shawn Qu, our chairman, president and chief executive officer, Bencheng Li, general manager of CSI Luoyang, Gregory Spanoudakis, our vice president of international sales and marketing, Robert Patterson, our vice president of corporate and product development and general manager of Canadian operations, and Bing Zhu, our chief financial officer.

If one or more of our executive officers are unable or unwilling to continue in. Therefore, our business may be severely disrupted, and we may incur additional expenses to recruit and retain new officers, in particular those with a significant mix of both international and China-based solar power industry experience as many of our current officers have. In addition, if any of our executives joins a competitor or forms a competing company, whether in violation of their agreements with us or otherwise, we may lose some of our customers.

We face risks associated with the marketing, distribution and sale of our solar module products internationally. If we are unable to effectively manage these risks, they could impair our ability to expand our business abroad.

The Rise Of Solar Power

The marketing, distribution and sale of our solar module products in the international markets expose us to a number of risks, including:. Problems with product quality or product performance, including defects, in our products could damage our reputation, or result in a decrease in customers and revenue, unexpected expenses and loss of market share. Our products may contain defects that are not detected until after they are shipped or are installed because we cannot test for all possible scenarios.

These defects could cause us to incur significant costs, divert the attention of our personnel from product development efforts and significantly affect our customer relations and business reputation. If we deliver solar module products with errors or defects, or if there is a perception that our products contain errors or defects, our credibility and the market acceptance and sales of our solar module products could be harmed. In two instances in , customers raised concerns about the stated versus actual performance output of some of our solar modules. We determined that both concerns resulted from differences in calibration methodologies and we resolved the issue with these customers.

However, the corrective actions and procedures that we took may turn out to be inadequate to prevent further incidents of the same problem or to protect against future errors or defects. In addition, some of our ingot, wafer and cell suppliers with whom we have toll manufacturing arrangements have raised concerns about the quality and consistency of the silicon feedstock, in particular the reclaimable silicon that we recycle through our silicon reclamation program for re-use in the solar power industry, that we have provided to them for their ultimate conversion into solar cells.

Marin Solar Program

The use of reclaimed silicon in the solar power supply chain has an inherent risk as it is difficult to maintain the consistency and quality of reclaimed silicon at the same level as high-purity silicon. The successful use of reclaimed silicon requires extensive experience, know-how and additional quality control measures from both the provider of reclaimed silicon and the toll manufacturers.

If we cannot successfully maintain the consistency and quality of the reclaimed silicon from our silicon reclamation program at an acceptable level, this may result in less efficient solar cells for our solar modules or in a lower conversion ratio of solar cells per ton of silicon feedstock that we provide, and may potentially delay and reduce our supply of solar cells. This may reduce or eliminate the cost advantages of recycling silicon through our silicon reclamation program.

This could also cause problems with product quality or product performance, including defects in our products, and increase the cost of producing our products. In addition, as we obtain the solar cells that we use in our products from third parties, either directly or through toll manufacturing arrangements, we have limited control over the quality of the solar cells we incorporate into our solar modules.

Unlike solar modules, which are subject to certain uniform international standards, solar cells generally do not have uniform international standards, and it is often difficult to determine whether solar module product defects are a result of the solar cells or other components or reasons. We also rely on third party suppliers for other components that we use in our products, such as glass, frame and backing for our solar modules, and electronic components for our specialty solar modules and products.

Furthermore, the solar cells and other components that we purchase from third party suppliers are typically sold to us without any, or with only limited, warranty. The possibility of future product failures could cause us to incur substantial expense to repair or replace defective products.

Furthermore, widespread product failures may damage our market reputation, reduce our market share and cause our revenues to decline. Since we cannot test our products for the duration of our standard warranty periods, we may be subject to unexpected warranty expense.

Marin Solar Program - Community Development Agency – County of Marin

Our standard solar modules are typically sold with a two-year guarantee for defects in materials and workmanship and a year and year warranty against declines of more than Our specialty solar modules and products are typically sold with a one-year guarantee against defects in materials and workmanship and may, depending on the characteristics of the product, contain a limited warranty of up to ten years, against declines of the minimum power generation capacity specified at the time of delivery. We believe our warranty periods are consistent with industry practice.

Due to the long warranty period, we bear the risk of extensive warranty claims long after we have shipped our products and recognized revenue. We began selling specialty solar modules and products in and only began selling standard solar modules in Any increase in the defect rate of our products would cause us to increase the amount of warranty reserves and have a corresponding negative impact on our operating results. Although we conduct quality testing and inspection of our solar module products, our solar module products have not been and cannot be tested in an environment simulating the up to year warranty periods.

Our future growth depends in part on our ability to make strategic acquisitions and investments and to establish and maintain strategic relationships, and our failure to do so could have a material adverse effect on our market penetration and revenue growth. The solar power industry has only recently emerged as a high growth market and is currently experiencing shortages of its key component, high-purity silicon, due to rapid industry growth and demand.

We believe it is critical that we continue to manage upstream silicon supply sources by, among other strategies, pursuing strategic acquisitions and investments in solar cell and silicon raw materials suppliers to secure a guaranteed supply and better control the specifications and quality of the materials delivered and fostering strategic relationships, particularly with silicon feedstock and solar cell suppliers. We cannot assure you, however, that we will be able to successfully make such strategic acquisitions and investments or establish strategic relationships with third parties that will prove to be effective for our business.

Our inability in this regard could have a material adverse effect on our market penetration, our revenue growth and our profitability. Strategic acquisitions, investments and relationships with third parties could subject us to a number of risks, including risks associated with sharing proprietary information and loss of control of operations that are material to our business. Moreover, strategic acquisitions, investments and relationships may be expensive to implement and subject us to the risk of non-performance by a counterparty, which may in turn lead to monetary losses that materially and adversely affect our business.

We may not succeed in developing a cost-effective solar cell manufacturing capability.

We plan to expand into areas further up the supply chain, including manufacturing solar cells to support our core solar module manufacturing business. We plan to complete our first solar cell production line in the first quarter of with commercial production targeted for the second quarter of We do not have any significant operating experience in this market and we will face significant challenges in the solar cell business.

Manufacturing solar cells is a highly complex process and we may not be able to produce solar cells of sufficient quality to meet our solar module manufacturing standards. Minor deviations in the manufacturing process can cause substantial decreases in yield and in some cases cause production to be suspended or yield no output.

We will need to make capital expenditures to purchase manufacturing equipment for solar cell production and will also need to make significant investments in research and development to keep pace with technological advances in solar power technology. The technologies, designs and customer preferences for solar cells change more rapidly, and solar cell product life cycles are shorter than those for solar modules.

We may not be able to successfully address these new challenges. We will also face increased costs to comply with environmental laws and regulations. Any failure to successfully develop a cost-effective solar cell manufacturing capability may have a material adverse effect on our business and prospects. In addition, although we intend to continue our toll manufacturing arrangements, if we engage in the large scale production of solar cells it may disrupt our existing relationships with solar cell suppliers. If solar cell suppliers discontinue or reduce the supply of solar cells to us, either through direct sales or through toll manufacturing arrangements, and we are not able to compensate for the loss or reduction with our own manufacturing of solar cells, our business and results of operations may be materially and adversely affected.

We may fail to successfully bring to market our new specialty solar modules and products, which may prevent us from achieving increased sales, margins and market share. We expect to derive a greater portion of our revenues from sales of our new specialty solar modules and products and will increase our research and development expenses in connection with developing these products.

If we fail to successfully develop our new specialty solar modules and products, we will likely be unable to recover the expenses that we will incur to develop these products and may be unable to increase our sales and market share and to increase our margins. Many of our new specialty solar modules and products have yet to receive market acceptance, and it is difficult to predict whether we will be successful in completing their development or whether they will be commercially successful.

We may also need to develop new manufacturing processes that have yet to be tested and which may result in lower production output. Our failure to protect our intellectual property rights in connection with new specialty solar modules and products may undermine our competitive position. As we develop and bring to market new specialty solar modules and products, we may need to increase our expenses to protect our intellectual property and our failure to protect our intellectual property rights may undermine our competitive position.